Is $1 million enough to retire?

Is $1 million enough to retire?

For many, having $1 million saved for retirement sounds like plenty, but when you break down the numbers, what once seemed like a fortune might seem like just passable or maybe even too little to maintain the lifestyle you have or fund the one you want.

Obviously, there’s no single answer for whether $1 million is enough to keep someone afloat during retirement—ostensibly, a frequent first-class jetsetter is going to need much more than that while someone opting for only simple pleasures may be satisfied with less.

If you’re a baby boomer and come out shy of the million dollar mark, know that you’re very much not alone. According to a survey from GoBankingRates, only 22% of individuals ages 55-64 and older have $300,000 or more set aside for the future and about 29% of those over 65 have nothing saved at all.

In fact, most Americans (81%) don’t actually know how much they’ll need to retire. But thanks to some general guidelines and user-friendly retirement calculators, it’s easy enough to estimate your target savings and see whether $1 million will allow you to afford the post-work life of your dreams. But how?

One rule of thumb is to plan on replacing 70-90% of your current income with savings and social security once you leave the workforce. That means if you make the American median annual household income of $55,775, then you should anticipate needing $39,042.50-$50,197.50 per year during retirement. However in an article for AARP, Dan Yu of EisnerAmper Wealth Advisors said that for the first 10 years of retirement, you are more likely to be spending 100% of your current income.

Another way of looking at it is by first calculating the bare minimum of how much you’ll need per year and then working backwards to see how much you need to save. Investopedia recommends using the 4% sustainable withdrawal rate, what they describe as “the amount you can withdraw through thick and thin and still expect your portfolio to last at least 30 years,” as a means of calculation. That means if you have $1 million saved, then your yearly budget will be around $40,000. If your retirement aspirations lean more towards golf resorts than improving your home garden, even with the additional $16,000 or so per year that you’ll receive through social security, $1 million will clearly not sustain you for long.

There’s also the added variable of your expected lifespan. While it may seem bleak to confront your own mortality, you need to calculate your yearly saving and spending with a time frame in mind. According to the CDC, the average life expectancy in the United States back in 2014 was 78.8 years old. But given that more Americans are living past 90, and a 65 year old upper middle class couple has a 43% chance that one or both partners will live a full 30 years more, you may end up stretching your savings for longer than you could have ever imagined.

Where you plan on living also has a massive impact on how far $1 million will get you. While a retiree in Sherman, Texas could lead a nice cushy life for 30 work-free years with a retirement account of just $408,116, a retiree in New York City would need more than 5 times that. SmartAsset calculated that the average retiree in NYC needs $2,250,845 in savings, allocating $47,000 per year for housing alone. Even a nest egg in Brooklyn isn’t much better—that too requires more than $1 million. Perhaps for that reason, New York City isn’t on Forbes list of best places to retire in 2017.

Even with the most careful planning, there are always going to be a few financial surprises along the way that may set you back more than a few pennies worth. Whether they’re negative like medical emergencies and subsequent health expenses or positive, like travel fare to a destination wedding, they’re still taking a bite out of your bank account that may not have been in your original budget. For this reason, it’s important to use the above guidelines and calculation tools as a rough estimate, and be on the safe side by saving more than you think you’ll need.

3 Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They Retire

3 Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They Retire

As the adage goes, “a life without regrets is a life not lived,” but it is also “better to regret what you have done than what you haven’t.” The three biggest regrets of retired baby boomers center on the things they have not done and teach the next generation to make more informed choices.

  1. Not Saving for Retirement Earlier

A rare absolute rule of finance is that people should start saving for retirement as early as possible, with the best time to start being in one’s twenties. Life expectancies are growing and show no signs of slowing down, so more money is needed to be stretched out for a longer period of time. Starting to save and invest as soon as one enters the full-time workforce can make a dramatic difference in the amount of money that accumulates by the time a person is ready to retire.

Many baby boomers failed to start saving on time and properly because they did not understand just how much money would be needed for their retirement. Some also did not know that receiving social security benefits or taking money out of retirement accounts before it is needed can have tax consequences that can substantially lower savings. Finally, many people tend to forget to adjust for inflation when considering whether they are satisfied with the rate of return on their investments.

  1. Not Working Less and Traveling More

A study of 2,000 baby boomers commissioned by British Airways revealed that one out of five boomers regrets not doing more traveling around the world. The survey data also indicate that only 9% of American workers get more than nine vacations days per year and that only 37% of Americans took all of their vacation days in 2015, suggesting that working too much may be an issue whose scope extends far beyond just the baby boomer generation.

A 10-year research project conducted by Karl Pillemer, Professor of Human Development at Cornell University, into the lives of 1,200 people aged 65 and older also revealed that lack of travel during one’s youth is a common regret. He writes, “To sum up what I learned in a sentence: When your traveling days are over, you will wish you had taken one more trip.”

  1. Not Working More

It might sound surprising given the decades of work they’ve done, but more than two-thirds of middle-income baby boomer retirees wish they had worked longer, and not for expected reasons. One might assume that people would want to continue working to keep earning their salaries, but for many baby boomers, wanting to keep working is about the work. People who are passionate about their careers and enjoy their work want to keep doing it. For this reason, many baby boomers return to the workforce on a part-time basis or as consultants. A number of baby boomers also enjoy working during their later years because they find that it keeps them mentally sharp, physically fit, and gives them a sense of purpose.

Three Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They’ve Retired

Three Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They’ve Retired

As the adage goes, “a life without regrets is a life not lived,” but it is also “better to regret what you have done than what you haven’t.” The three biggest regrets of retired baby boomers center on the things they have not done and teach the next generation to make more informed choices.

1. Not Saving for Retirement Earlier

A rare absolute rule of finance is that people should start saving for retirement as early as possible, with the best time to start being in one’s twenties. Life expectancies are growing and show no signs of slowing down, so more money is needed to be stretched out for a longer period of time. Starting to save and invest as soon as one enters the full-time workforce can make a dramatic difference in the amount of money that accumulates by the time a person is ready to retire.

Many baby boomers failed to start saving on time and properly because they did not understand just how much money would be needed for their retirement. Some also did not know that receiving social security benefits or taking money out of retirement accounts before it is needed can have tax consequences that can substantially lower savings. Finally, many people tend to forget to adjust for inflation when considering whether they are satisfied with the rate of return on their investments.

2.Not Working Less and Traveling More

A study of 2,000 baby boomers commissioned by British Airways revealed that one out of five boomers regrets not doing more traveling around the world. The survey data also indicate that only 9% of American workers get more than nine vacations days per year and that only 37% of Americans took all of their vacation days in 2015, suggesting that working too much may be an issue whose scope extends far beyond just the baby boomer generation.

A 10-year research project conducted by Karl Pillemer, Professor of Human Development at Cornell University, into the lives of 1,200 people aged 65 and older also revealed that lack of travel during one’s youth is a common regret. He writes, “To sum up what I learned in a sentence: When your traveling days are over, you will wish you had taken one more trip.”

3. Not Working More

It might sound surprising given the decades of work they’ve done, but more than two-thirds of middle-income baby boomer retirees wish they had worked longer, and not for expected reasons. One might assume that people would want to continue working to keep earning their salaries, but for many baby boomers, wanting to keep working is about the work. People who are passionate about their careers and enjoy their work want to keep doing it. For this reason, many baby boomers return to the workforce on a part-time basis or as consultants. A number of baby boomers also enjoy working during their later years because they find that it keeps them mentally sharp, physically fit, and gives them a sense of purpose.

Goldstone Financial Group: The Discussion Every Couple Should Have for Retirement

Goldstone Financial Group: The Discussion Every Couple Should Have for Retirement

Even as they enter their 50s and 60s, couples tend to avoid discussing their retirement. Although the subject can be uncomfortable because it touches on the end of life, not talking about retirement often leads to problems, both financial and domestic. To ensure that you and your partner are both well taken care of when you choose transition from the workforce, we recommend that you discuss the topics outlined below as early as you can.

  1. When do you plan to retire?

Because this question impacts both finances and lifestyle, it can often be the most difficult one for couples to resolve. Your partner may wish to retire early after a prosperous career, but you still feel satisfied in your work and are not yet ready to leave it behind.

The best way to get past a potential roadblock is to examine the impact one partner’s earlier retirement will have on your mutual financial situation. Having one partner remain in the workforce can increase retirement savings, grow your employer-sponsored pension, and delay taking out social security benefits, which can be helpful in making sure that neither of you run out of money once you’re both fully retired. Having one partner keep working may be especially beneficial in light of the fact that women are expected to live as much as 10 years longer than men, which could result in their living past their retirement savings.

  1. Where do you plan to retire?

This question impacts the kind of lifestyle you and your partner might want. Talk about your interests and the activities you wish to pursue in your free time. Depending on whether you’d like to live in a pricier urban setting or somewhere less expensive and more rural, the answer will also impact your finances. State income and property taxes, which vary widely, can also affect your decision. Whether to live in a house—which can require financial investments for upkeep as it ages—or to downsize to a condominium to free up more cash and have less maintenance activities to worry about is another key point to consider.

  1. What does retirement mean to you / how will we spend our time?

If you’re both retiring around the same time, do you or your partner plan to work part-time, whether to make extra money or simply to remain active, as many retired professionals increasingly do today? If one of you chooses to retire early, will that partner help the other in his or her professional career? Would you or your partner be happy spending your days pursuing exclusively non-professional interests? What do those interests include? Consider the costs of travel, theatre, family time, etc.

Developing a financial plan for retirement can help answer these questions. It is recommended that each partner prepare to answer these questions separately, as that will make your discussion more productive when you come together to merge your ideas into a unified plan. Do not let yourselves get frustrated if you cannot find common ground right away. Plans of this nature often take months of negotiation before they are set.

  1. Whose investment style will we follow to meet our mutual goals?

You or your partner may manage your own 401(k)s or IRAs as you move through your careers. This individualized approach does not need to change. However, the two of you should choose a financial advisor that can guide both of your individualized efforts to work together in an overall portfolio that serves your mutual goals. You should also discuss ways to keep your investment funds growing even after you begin drawing on them.

  1. Will we leave any money to our children and/or to charity?

If you’ve come to this point in your retirement discussion, it is likely that you have agreed upon the points outlined above to your mutual satisfaction. Still, this topic can also produce passionate discussion, depending on your family situation. After you agree upon the best ways to serve your family and legacy, we recommend working with a financial advisor to learn about the many different tools for passing on wealth to heirs or the charitable organization(s) of your choice.

Goldstone Financial Group: Top 4 Tax-free Options for Retirement Planning

Goldstone Financial Group: Top 4 Tax-free Options for Retirement Planning

When planning for retirement, it’s essential to consider multiple sources of income. Social Security may not be as beneficial as expected, particularly after taxes. Outside of pouring money into savings, pre-retirees should look into options for non-taxable income well before the time comes to call it quits.

Here are four ways to start building towards a tax-free future in retirement.

Roth IRA:

One of the best options for retirees looking for tax-free income is the Roth IRA. Unlike most other retirement plans, a Roth IRA grants a tax break on withdrawals rather than contributions. Direct contributions can be withdrawn at any time, without worry of tax or penalty. Earnings can be withdrawn tax-free as well, after a five-year period, and for individuals 59 and a half years of age or older.

The Roth IRA has advantages over alternative tax-free options such as municipal bonds. Though munis have no income limit, the interest they pay is generally less than taxable bonds, and they may be subject to state income taxes. Also, municipal bonds may be counted as a source of income for early recipients of Social Security, potentially hurting their pay if they make $15,000 or more.

Unfortunately, the Roth IRA has income limits that disqualify some people from making contributions. Many people hold off until after retirement when they enter a lower income bracket, though financial experts advise making contributions as early as possible for greater benefits down the line.

Roth 401(k), 403 (b):

Plans such as the 401(k) can accumulate huge savings as the employer will match whatever the employee contributes. The IRS also allows for Roth contributions to 401(k) and 403(b) accounts. While the Roth IRA has an annual contribution limit of $5,000 or $6,000 (depending on age), the limits on Roth 401(k) contributions are much higher and are not restricted by income eligibility.

Regardless, pre-retirees should look to max out their contributions to company-sponsored plans each year. It will pay off in the future.

Health savings account:

Some employers offer an HSA-qualified health plan, allowing employees to contribute tax-deductible funds that roll over and accumulate each year. These funds can be withdrawn at a later date to pay for various medical procedures, some of which may not be covered by health insurance.

A health savings account can eventually become a useful source of tax-free retirement income as the funds can be used as reimbursements for past medical expenses, or to pay for current Medicare premiums and health costs. Withdrawals are not subject to income taxation if made for qualified medical expenses.

Life insurance:

Though most people look at life insurance as something that will only be of benefit after they pass on, it can also become a potential source of retirement income.

A life insurance retirement plan (LIRP) allows owners to contribute funds beyond that required by the plan’s premiums and later withdraw the excess cash tax-free.

According to expert Kevin Kimbrough of Saybrus Partners, these funds accumulate similar to an annuity but come with an added benefit.

“Unlike the annuity, you’re able to take your basis out first and that comes out tax free,” said Kimbrough to ThinkAdvisor. “When you get into the gains, you’re able to switch over and start taking policy loans against the income-tax-free death benefit.”

This method is usually better suited for higher earners, due to the fees associated with such an investment. It’s highly advisable that pre-retirees examine their portfolio, research and adopt a plan best suited for their particular circumstances.

“There are only two options in retirement: You can be working for your money or your money can be working for you. You have to be realistic and ask yourself if you really can retire when you’d like,” said finance advisor Christopher Kimball to Turbotax. “During retirement, it is critical to monitor your investments and current tax law. You should be positioned to take money from whatever ‘bucket’ is most beneficial at the time.”