While wealth managers and private bankers may seem interchangeable, these two financial services professionals are different. As you look for assistance and advice in managing your money, here’s what you need to know when deciding which one will best fit your financial needs.

 

What are they exactly?

One difference between wealth managers and private bankers is the way they interact with their clients. While there are many overlapping areas in their two approaches to managing money, wealth managers are more holistic; they get to know their clients individually and help them assess, manage, and plan their financial futures.

Though private bankers also provide financial guidance, they primarily work with high-net-worth individuals (HNWI) and provide access to concierge banking services that go far beyond what a typical bank customer would receive. And, unlike wealth managers, private bankers do not invest their clients’ assets—although they may provide in-house investment opportunities from time to time.

 

What do they do?

Wealth managers provide a long list of financial services to help you create and execute long-term plans for your finances and optimize your portfolio. Along with offering advice and recommendations on financial decisions, they can also execute investments. They bring to the job significant experience from working with other clients to provide context and seasoned advice for your financial decisions. You’ll meet in person with your wealth manager to talk extensively about your financial plans and current situation as well as your comfort level with risk.

Along with connecting clients with financial and legal specialists, wealth managers can provide services such as:

  • Estate planning
  • Tax strategies
  • Retirement planning
  • Charitable giving planning
  • Risk management
  • Financial planning
  • Trust services
  • Investment advice
  • Legal planning

As with almost all financial advisors, you’ll likely be charged a fee (typically a percentage of assets under management that averages about 1 percent annually) for a wealth manager’s services. However, some may bill an hourly or fixed annual fee.

Private bankers offer similar services, including cash-flow management, investment planning, estate planning, and risk management. Banks assign HNWIs a private banker, who looks over their finances and sets up banking services that cater to their needs. Clients also are given access to perks and financial services at their bank, such as higher interest rates, prime mortgage rates, no fees or overdraft charges, and preferential pricing. Private banking clients will never have to stand in line for a teller or wait to meet with a banking specialist. They also will have access to exclusive opportunities such as private equity partnerships and hedge funds. Clients typically do not pay fees for private banking services, as private bankers are paid by the institutions that employ them.

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Who do they serve?

Private bankers work with HNWIs—a client group that each bank may define a little differently. In general, however, an HNWI has at least $1 million in investible assets, although some banks will allow clients with liquid financial assets in the six figures access to private banking services.

Wealth managers typically have served a similar clientele, but in recent years, their services have become available to clients who aren’t considered HNWI but still have a considerable amount of investable assets.

 

Client relationships

Wealth managers build their practices on the relationships they have with each client. That means that you’ll do much more than fill out a survey or answer cursory questions when you first meet with your wealth manager. They will want to talk with you at length about your values, goals, and life plans. They may ask about any anxieties you have about your financial future, such as paying for your children’s college tuition or saving enough to retire comfortably. As your wealth manager gets to know you and what you value, they will be better equipped to guide you in all aspects of your financial life and build long-term strategies to help you reach your financial goals. As your relationship with your wealth manager deepens, you’ll likely find that they become an indispensable part of your financial decision-making process.

Private bankers may play a similar role in your financial life depending on the level of involvement your bank offers. However, turnover can be high—when a private banker moves to another institution, you’ll have to decide whether to stay with your bank or move with your private banker.

 

How do I choose one?

Deciding whether to work with a private banker or a wealth manager depends on your needs. If you are looking for financial advice along with the perks that a financial institution will offer an HNWI, you’ll likely want to work with a private banker with the financial institution that holds your money. If you are more interested in wealth management, you should research firms to find a good fit. Be sure to examine the firm’s size, services, and costs as well as any potential wealth manager’s expertise and experience.