Retirement planning advice—which is not in short supply—can linger long past its time. Advice that may have worked 20 years ago, for example, may not be as applicable today, when the economy is different and people are making different choices about their retirement. It may be time to reconsider the following common retirement advice.

You Must Pay Off Your Debts, Including Your Mortgage

In reality, this advice is unachievable for many Americans. Becoming debt-free for many may be impossible or so difficult that it pushes retirement back many years. Following this guideline, then, would mean trading enjoyment in your senior years for more years of work.

In some cases, it’s OK to carry debt into your retirement; the key is determining which debt is manageable. Paying off high-interest debt, such as credit card balances, is important—interest rates on credit card debt can be 15% or higher, which means your debt can quickly build. Growing debt and a fixed retirement income aren’t compatible, and in this case, it’s a good idea to pay off all high-interest debt before retirement.

Other debt, however, may be tolerable—and even beneficial—during retirement. If you can comfortably make the payments on low-interest debt with your retirement income, there’s no reason to postpone retirement. In other situations, your money may be better spent on investments rather than paying off low-interest debt. For example, if your mortgage interest rate is 4% and your investments are generating a 6.5% rate of return, it makes more sense to invest your money rather than use it to make additional mortgage payments.

house payments

The 4% Retirement Withdrawal Rule

This rule was developed in the 1990s. It essentially says that you’re ready to retire when your savings will last for 30 years if you plan to withdraw 4% of your retirement savings the first year and a similar amount, adjusted to inflation, over the remaining 29 years.

However, many financial planners say this formula doesn’t fit all retirement situations and doesn’t take into account a fluctuating market. Retirees also don’t spend consistently over the course of their retirement—they tend to spend more in the early years when they are traveling and marking off experiences on their “bucket list.” Spending may drop as retirees settle down or increase if health issues arise.

A better strategy is to consult with a financial planner about a safe withdrawal strategy based on your circumstances and plans for your senior years. For example, a plan could be built around your required minimum distributions, or you could calculate what you need to cover basic living expenses and then factor additional money into your budget for travel and other expenses.

You Need $1 Million in Savings

Saving $1 million has been the longtime gold standard for retirement, but more recent estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics have increased that estimate to $1.5 million per family. Reasons for the increase include a drop in pensions, which previously could be relied upon to supplement retirement savings; inflation; and longer lifespans. Many people are in retirement for three decades or more.

Retirees Spend Less

Retirement doesn’t necessarily cause your spending to decrease. Traditional guidelines state that retirees should plan to spend between 75% and 85% of their current budget, but that estimate doesn’t always hold true.

The best way to map out retirement spending is to make a retirement budget, estimating what you’ll spend each month when you stop working. You may delete some budget items, like commuting costs, but you may take on new expenses with more travel or new hobbies. Creating a retirement budget will help you avoid an unexpected surprise if your spending in retirement doesn’t drop.

Social Security Withdrawals Should Begin at a Certain Age

Conventional wisdom has advised everything from withdrawing benefits immediately when you become eligible at 62 to delaying until you reach 70. In reality, the ideal age to begin claiming Social Security benefits depends on your individual situation.

The best time for you to claim benefits will depend on your retirement budget. For example, if you begin withdrawing at age 62, your monthly benefits will be reduced because you haven’t reached your full retirement age, which will range between 66 and 67, depending on your birth year. If you wait until your full retirement age, your monthly check will include a bonus.

Retirees with comfortable savings may choose to withdraw early for extra spending cash, while people who know they will need help with income later in retirement may want to hold off so their monthly check is larger. Your health may also be an issue—people in good health who think they will live a long time may want to delay claiming benefits, while those who are in declining health may benefit more from larger checks now.

Regardless of your situation, it’s wise to consult with a financial planner about your retirement plan to make the most of the options available.