Life is full of unexpected situations that may have required you to pull from your retirement savings to cover pressing, unanticipated expenses. Although such situations can present challenges to the integrity of your retirement fund, there are several things you can do to reinvigorate your savings.

First, identify what caused the drain in your retirement savings. This step may seem obvious, but it’s important to take time to evaluate the factors that led to your emergent situation so that you can take steps to avoid them again in the future. With time and careful consideration, you can prepare for future unexpected situations.

Generally, it is advisable to save cash reserves to cover expenses for anywhere between three and six months. If you’re a homeowner, you should be able to cover six to 12 months. In addition, you should keep the amounts of the deductibles for your homeowners, flood, car, and health insurance. As an added precaution, set aside 1 percent of your home’s value each year for repairs.

Next, cut expenses and prioritize retirement. Because people spend the majority of their careers thinking that retirement is far away, other more immediate expenses often take priority over saving for a seemingly distant eventuality. However, dipping into retirement savings to cover an emergency signals that spending less on lower priority expenses may be necessary in order to recoup your losses. To help you accomplish this, refer back to the first step and evaluate what expenses you can minimize or maybe live without (at least for a while). Finding tax preferential vehicles such as municipal bonds, MLPs, and real estate in addition to the retirement accounts you already hold can help you get back on track as well.

Start saving small amounts to develop good saving habits and begin replenishing your retirement fund. Easing into monthly saving can help you get your retirement savings back on track without presenting you with a harsh burden. Starting by saving just 1 percent of your annual income in a company retirement plan helps you form a habit of saving. The 1 percent amount is small enough that it won’t be missed but big enough to keep the need to save for retirement fresh in your mind. It also helps you to save more as time goes on. By increasing the amount you save by an addition 1 percent of your income every other month, you will quickly be on your way to substantially rebuilding your retirement savings.

Eventually, you should increase your contributions to company retirement funds to the maximum amounts allowed by your 401(k)s and IRAs. Taking advantage of matching employer contributions will also be beneficial. If you are aged 50 or above, you can also potentially take advantage of up to $1,000 in catch-up IRA contributions and up to $6,000 for catch-up 401(k) contributions.

Pursue an extra job or income-generating side project to help fill in the gap.

Picking up a second job or an extra client or two can help generate additional income that can be set aside for retirement without impacting present-day expenses. If your spouse or partner does not work, having him or her join the workforce can be a great boon. Alternatively, if you are already retired, consider turning a hobby into an income-generating project. Or, apply to a big company, whose employee insurance plan can help cover healthcare costs. However, if you are unable to pursue any of the examples above, even simple things like tutoring or helping neighbors with some yard work can help supplement other income.

Delay retirement and social security to make sure you have more money for later. The best way to improve a retirement portfolio’s longevity is to delay drawing on it. Delaying retirement allows more time to build greater savings and also ensures that saved funds that you have accumulated will last longer into the future because they are being drawn on later in time. If you delay your social security benefits until after retirement age, your benefit grows with each year of delay.

If you’re a homeowner and your home has sizable home equity, consider a reverse mortgage. A reverse mortgage allows people aged 62 and over to receive tax-free cash in a lump sum or fixed payments. Moreover, the mortgage does not need to be paid until the homeowner moves out or dies. However, there are closing costs associated with this type of mortgage, and the homeowner must maintain the home. Although seniors often consider a reverse mortgage to be a last resort, it is a viable option provided that it is obtained from a reputable lender and that the homeowner understands how the mortgage works.