Estate planning is a vital step in not only ensuring that your assets are distributed according to your wishes upon your death, but it also prevents conflict that could arise among your survivors if they are left to make decisions about your estate themselves.

If the cost of estate planning has you thinking twice, consider the possible issues that could arise without it. Young children could be left without guardians, and irreparable rifts could develop between adult children trying to split assets themselves. You would leave a lifetime of assets in the hands of others with no say in where they go next. But if you have an estate plan, your survivors will not have to worry about making decisions about your estate while they are grieving.

Here’s a breakdown of fees associated with estate planning.

 

Online vs. In-person

While the Internet can be a great source of information, it’s not where you want to spend your money on estate planning. You’ll find plenty of do-it-yourself estate planning kits online (for a fee) that will allow you to create a simple will online, but don’t fall for their easy approach and low costs. This type of planning may work for someone with no beneficiaries and few assets, but everyone else should hire a professional.

The best use of the Internet in estate planning? Using it to do initial research into the field and come up with smart questions for your professional estate planner.

 

Costs

The costs of estate planning will vary according to the professional’s fee and how complex your property is. The cost for a simple, straightforward will could be a low as $150, while a complicated estate may require thousands of dollars.

Estate planning professionals, who can include attorneys and financial planners, typically will charge flat fees or an hourly rate.

 

Flat Fees

Estate planning professionals using this pricing system will charge a set price, often based on their experience and the work that they offer. If you are offered a flat fee, it’s important to ask the attorney or finance professional what that fee covers, as it may not include extras such as a notary fee, and how they expect payment. Some professionals require the entire flat fee up front, while others may ask for only part of the fee before they start on your plan.

 

Hourly Rate

Other professionals charge an hourly rate; this will cover all the time that the lawyer or planner spends working on your estate. In some cases, the professional also may ask for an initial retainer fee, which you will pay before work begins.

This fee schedule often applies to more complex estates that will require additional work.

 

Initial Consultation

Your first meeting with the professional, which can take place in-person or virtually, typically won’t include a consultation fee. During this meeting, which can last up to an hour, you’ll talk to them about your situation and figure out the extent of estate planning you will need. While this meeting may be free, expect to pay for future consultations.

As you meet with estate planning professionals to determine which one you will work with, be sure to ask each how much they charge, what fee schedule they use, and what services they provide for that cost. This information will help you choose both an affordable service and one that can handle your estate.

 

Can My Bill Increase?

Yes. Even if your financial professional has given you a rate and detailed list of services that rate covers, it’s still possible they will run into work outside of that scope once they delve into your estate. To offset any surprises, talk to them up front to understand when and how much they charge in extra fees.

 

Managing Your Estate Planning Costs

To keep your estate planning in your budget, you can take steps in advance to minimize the costs.

  • Prepare your questions: Before you start shopping for an estate planner, know what you need. Read up on basic estate plans, which documents are required, and what you need to know more about.
  • Shop around: Don’t work with the first person you talk to. Take time to learn about various firms, read their reviews, and compare what they offer. You also can schedule consultations with each one to gain more points of comparison.
  • Ask about costs: To avoid unexpected fees and costs, talk frankly about money during your consultation. Ask questions about their fees, rates, and scope of work so that you’ll know what you’re paying for and what could become an extra cost.
  • Sign a contract: This is not the time to take a business on its word. Have the firm draft a work agreement, including costs, that both of you sign.