Two key considerations in retirement planning are ensuring that you outlive your retirement income and that your financial plan can withstand changes in the market. Pensions used to provide this assurance, but as these types of savings plans become rarer, you may have to create your own guaranteed retirement income.

Deferred income annuities (DIAs) are a sometimes-overlooked financial tool that fortify retirement portfolios and guarantee that retirees will have a cash flow, regardless of market ups and downs. While financial advisers generally will not recommend investing the majority of your portfolio in a deferred income annuity, many do advise retirees to include them in their portfolios.

Why are these financial tools such a good idea? The main reason is they provide a guaranteed income for life, whether you live to 80 or 100. While the income they generate may not be enough to cover all your living expenses, they can provide peace of mind and a reliable source of income in your retirement years.

 

How Deferred Income Annuities Work

Unlike other investments that produce income, deferred income annuities guarantee income as long as you are alive—no matter how long your lifespan. This works because DIAs operate on the concept of the “mortality credit,” which means that the assets from annuities whose recipients live for shorter periods of time stay in the “mortality pool” to work for recipients who live longer. DIAs are managed by insurers, who can share risk with other clients.

To build a DIA, a buyer invests a one-time amount or makes incremental payments to an insurer, who invests the money and guarantees a regular income later on. The investor can choose when to start taking payments, although most begin at age 80 or later to ensure they have an income in the last year of life.

The key to maximizing income from DIAs, which convert part of your savings into regular income, is to invest before you retire. An early start can mean a higher stream of income after you stop working. Financial advisers generally recommend DIAs for everyone except those who can’t afford to commit their money to an investment, as DIAs are not liquid.

There are several good strategies for investing in a DIA. First, make a DIA part of a diversified portfolio, since it is not impacted by market conditions. A DIA can stabilize income projections and provide assurance that your basic bills will be covered in retirement (along with other guaranteed incomes from sources such as Social Security and work pensions). Investing in a DIA incrementally long before your retirement date also is an excellent way to build your own pension fund.

You and your spouse can each buy your own DIA, or you can buy one as a couple with a joint payout that guarantees the surviving spouse will continue receiving payments. For those concerned that they will die before they receive payouts or before payouts exceed the amount of the original deposit, ask your insurer about a return-of-premium option that will give beneficiaries the original deposit back. Be aware that this option will reduce the payout amount a little.

 

Why DIAs Are a Good Choice

The biggest advantage of DIAs is that you don’t use them until many years after you’ve invested. For example, if you buy a DIA when you are 50 years old, but don’t withdraw income until you are 80, you’re benefiting from annuities growth after 30 years of compounding interest.

Unlike an IRA or 401(k), which also grows over time and offers tax advantages, a DIA that’s not in a retirement plan (aka a nonqualified annuity) does not require you to begin withdrawals at age 72 to defer taxes. Additionally, DIAs do not have limits on how much you can contribute each year.

DIAs also provide more flexibility in how you distribute your retirement savings. For example, if you retire at age 70 and invest part of your savings in a DIA that you won’t use until you are 85, you can use the rest of your retirement money for income during the 15 years between 70 and 85. This will allow you more freedom with your money early in retirement, because you know you have a guaranteed income planned for your later years.

 

When Should You Buy a DIA?

The best time to buy a DIA is five to 10 years before you plan to retire, usually between ages 55 and 65. This will lengthen the duration of your deferral period and increase the size of your payouts.

Deferring the payout also allows you to make additional investments in your DIA over a long period of time, taking advantage of potentially lower interest rates as rates fluctuate. Investing in an asset that provides guaranteed income also reduces the need to take on riskier investments or to sell your investments in a down market to generate cash flow.