3 Valuable Lessons You Learn When You Start Saving for Retirement Early

3 Valuable Lessons You Learn When You Start Saving for Retirement Early

One of the most common questions people ask their financial advisors is, when should I start saving for retirement? Virtually across the board, financial advisors will say that you should start as early as possible—ideally when you’re in your 20s and have just launched your career.

Of course, there’s no reason to despair if you didn’t start a retirement fund right out of college. Not everyone in their 20s has the foresight to start saving for something decades in the future, especially since many employers do not offer a savings-matching program. If you started saving for retirement later in life, the situation certainly isn’t hopeless, but it is a bit more urgent. You’ll need to save more and be more focused to meet the same goals, since you’ll have less time to achieve them.

However, if you start early, you’ll enjoy a wide range of benefits, including the increased flexibility that compounding interest provides. You’ll also be able to take more chances with your investments, because you’ll have more time to recover from losses. Another major benefit of starting early is that it instills good habits early on.

When you start to plan for retirement in your 20s, you’ll learn several lessons that will serve you well for the rest of your financial future. These include:

 

  1. Learning the value of compounding.

If you’re in your 20s, you have a lot of time before you retire and can use this to your advantage. Making money grow over the course of 40 years is much easier than achieving the same thing in half that time. Even when your money just sits there, over time it can double, triple, or quadruple. The best way to understand the value of compounding is to think about the math behind it.

As a hypothetical situation, imagine you save $6,000 toward retirement each year until the age of 65 at a 7-percent rate of return. If you start saving at age 45, you will have about $246,000 in the account when you reach retirement age. If you begin saving at 35, the account would have about $567,000. However, starting at the age of 25 means you’ll amass nearly $1,198,000. In other words, starting at 25 nearly quintuples the final amount saved, compared to starting at 45. This happens even though you would only contribute an additional $120,000, or $6,000 annually, for the 20 years between age 25 and 45. This math underscores that your savings depend not only on how much you contribute, but also on how long you’ve been contributing.

 

financial planning

 

  1. Understanding how to maximize employee benefits.

Employers often provide some sort of retirement benefit for full-time employees. Most commonly, you’ll have access to a 401(k) plan through your company. Understanding these accounts and how they work sooner, rather than later, will make it easier to use them strategically down the line, when choosing the right investments becomes extremely important. When you start contributing to your 401(k) early, you’ll have some time to play with the account without serious consequences.

A 401(k) typically rises and falls with the stock market and continues to grow over time. Money for the account is taken directly out of your paycheck, so you never see it. If you’re lucky, your employer will match your contributions to the account at some percentage—this can be a major boon and add up quickly. Plus, this matching is essentially free money, so it makes sense to take advantage of it. Some employers will offer profit-sharing instead, which means that a portion of the company’s profits is put into your 401(k) account, reducing your tax liability.

 

  1. Keeping meticulous records and budgets.

People save money when they spend less than they bring in. The concept is simple, of course, but it’s a lesson many of us learn the hard way. However, saving for retirement will encourage you to become more discerning with your money, and you’ll soon learn to keep track of exactly where it goes. This skill will become more important over time, especially when it’s time to save for a down payment on a house or pay off a big debt. Ideally, people in their 20s should strive to live on about 85 percent of their income and save or invest the rest.

Keeping track of spending has become simultaneously more and less difficult. It’s easier than ever to buy things today; sometimes it only takes a few taps on a screen or one click of a button. Because of this, impulse spending can be hard to avoid.

At the same time, technology does a lot of the recordkeeping for us. Most of us no longer have to spend time adding and subtracting columns of numbers to balance a checkbook. In addition, smartphone apps can help track your spending; basic spreadsheets on your desktop computer are also effective. Whatever method you use, keeping track of spending can help you stay out of debt or pay off a large debt that must be wiped out before you can begin saving for retirement in earnest.

 

The Bottom Line: When it comes to saving for retirement, there really is no such thing as too soon. People who start saving early will set themselves up for success down the line by learning critical lessons about finance and investing. In addition, starting to save early, even if only a small amount, leads to significant gains because of compounding interest. If you think you can’t save, re-examine your finances to see if you can cut back on spending in some places. Putting aside even a little bit of money each month will help you establish a lifelong habit that will pay off enormously in the end.

Ways to Build a Lasting Legacy Plan

Retiring well requires implementing a set of plans that will last. Making these arrangements can feel cumbersome and bring up awkward family conversations, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Goldstone Financial Group’s owner and principal Anthony Pellegrino built his career on helping clients achieve financial success and make lasting plans that put families at ease. His commitment to legacy plans has ensured that his clients can enter their golden years with a champagne toast.

Why is a legacy plan so important? Studies show that traditional estate plans are 70% likely to be lost by the second generation and 90% by the third. Many clients have panicked reactions to this information, but there’s no need to start hoarding cash in your mattress. What you’ve done in an estate plan can be easily incorporated into a legacy plan that will last for generations.

Here are the top 5 ways to build a legacy plan.

To read the full article, click here!

Understanding the True Cost of Hidden Fees With Goldstone Financial Group

Anthony Pellegrino | Goldstone Financial Group

A 1% fee doesn’t seem like much at first glance. After all, basic math tells us that it would only claim a single dollar out of a hundred or ten out of a thousand. To a new investor or aspiring retiree, signing over one or even two percent of a portfolio’s earnings might seem like a reasonable — or even small! — price to pay for enjoying the remaining 99% later in life.

A 1% cost might not look like much — but appearances can be deceiving. When it comes to investments, administrative expenses that may have seemed almost negligible at first can burgeon into costly financial demands. Mutual funds are particularly notorious for their plethora of so-called “hidden fees,” which often carve a significant portion of a portfolio’s future value away in a series of small cuts. Worse, these costs are often applied internally and may not be visible on your monthly statement; if you don’t go out of your way to investigate your accounts, you may never know precisely how much of your profits minor fees claim each year.

To continue our example — one dollar out of a hundred isn’t much of a loss. However, the primary financial drain to your account isn’t the initial deduction, but the opportunity cost posed by losing that dollar. By giving it up, you sacrifice its potential to compound and grow as an investment asset. For robust retirement accounts, these 1–2% fees could end up costing a retiree hundreds of thousands in lost profits. In 2018, analysts from Nerdwallet applied these average fees to a hypothetical millennial and found that over 40 years of saving, the investor would lose more than $500,000 to average charges.

Let’s break this down further.

To read the full article, click here! 

Investment Advisory Services offered through Goldstone Financial Group, LLC a Registered Investment Advisor (GFG). GFG is located at One Lincoln Centre, 18W140 Butterfield Rd., 14th Floor, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181, Telephone number — 630–620–9300.

Social Security Updates

Good news for retirees: Social Security benefits are scheduled to increase 2.8 percent in 2019, the biggest bump since the 3.6 percent increase in 2012.The average beneficiary – who received about $1,405 a month in 2018 – can expect to see just over $39 more each month, or about $468 more over the course of the year.1

Such cost of living increases are meant to cover household expenses that rise due to inflation. However, if you can absorb those additional costs, you could think about redirecting that additional payout toward helping to meet your long-term financial goals. For example, an emergency savings account or a life insurance policy designed to pay for funeral expenses. If you would like help with this, please give us a call.

There are a few more updates to Social Security for 2019. For one, the supplemental benefit paid to those who are blind or disabled will increase to $771 from $750 per individual; to $1,157 from $1,125 for couples. Second, if you’re currently working while receiving benefits, you can earn a bit more before those benefits are reduced. Moving forward, you may now earn up to $17,640 before $1 is deducted for every $2 you earn. In the year before you turn your full retirement age, you may earn up to $46,920 before $1 is deducted for every $3 you earn until the month you reach your full retirement age. And third, for those who are still working and have not yet started receiving benefits, the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax will increase to $132,900 from $128,400.2

Some advocate eliminating the earnings cap to keep Social Security solvent in the future. That’s because the brunt of taxes dedicated to Social Security comes from lower-income earners, while high earners avoid this tax on earnings above $132,900. In fact, due to the increase in income disparity in the United States, a much higher level of earned income is now exempted from this payroll tax compared to the 1980s – $300 billion in 1983 versus $1.2 trillion in 2016.3

Other changes in addition to eliminating the taxable income cap have also been proposed. One option, which could benefit both the Social Security fund as a whole and individual retirees, is encouraging retirees to delay claiming Social Security benefits. For every year delayed, one’s benefits increase 8 percent. Those who wait to take the benefit until age 67 receive about 43 percent more a month; those who wait until age 70 receive about 75 percent more in lifetime monthly benefits.4

Social Security benefits – both funding and payouts – can be complex. It is worthwhile to stay abreast of the policies, changes and strategies that can help maximize benefits. For additional information, try out this quiz – which also gives a detailed explanation of the correct answers to help you become better educated about Social Security.5

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

John Wasik. Forbes. Nov. 2, 2018. “5 Things You Should Know About Social Security Changes.”https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwasik/2018/11/02/5-things-you-should-know-about-social-security-changes/. Accessed Nov. 9, 2018.

2 Ibid.

Sean Williams. USA Today. Nov. 9, 2018. “Why the Social Security program will never run out of cash.”https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/11/09/when-does-social-security-run-out/38452267/. Accessed Nov. 9, 2018.

Knowledge@Wharton. Oct. 3, 2018. “Delaying Social Security: How Lump Sum Payments Can Help.”http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/delay-social-security/. Accessed Nov. 8, 2018.

Matthew Frankel. USA Today. June 2, 2018. “47% of American pre-retirees failed this basic Social Security quiz. Can you pass it?”https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/retirement/2018/06/02/pre-retirees-failed-basic-social-security-quiz/35343701/. Accessed Nov. 9, 2018.

Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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What Should You Look for in a Financial Advisor?

All financial advisors are not equally helpful. In this episode, Michael and Anthony Pellegrino illustrate why your choice of financial advisor could guide — or derail — your journey into retirement. The advice you receive will set the foundation for your financial future; you need to make sure that the person you turn to for help has your best interests at heart.

As Michael explains, there are two primary categories of advisors. The first is a fiduciary. All of Goldstone Financial Group’s advisors are certified fiduciaries and are thus legally obligated to put their clients’ needs above their own financial interests. The second category of advisors holds to a suitability standard. Unlike fiduciaries, suitability-grade professionals do not consider the client’s long-term financial health. So long as the advisor deems a product suitable for the situation at hand, they can sell it — regardless of whether it will still be useful in five or ten years. The only way that a client can be certain that their advisor has their best interests at heart is to sign on with a fiduciary.

However, a fiduciary certification alone doesn’t guarantee that an advisor is right for you. As Michael and Anthony Pellegrino point out in this episode, a genuinely effective advisor has other positive qualities.

Good Listening Skills

Even the best-qualified advisors will fall short if they don’t bother to engage with their clients. They need to listen to their clients’ goals, acknowledge their concerns, and ask the questions that will give them enough context to establish a solid financial plan.

Accessibility

Advisors should be accessible — and yet, many retirees find it difficult to schedule an appointment that lasts long enough for their advisor to address their questions and concerns fully. This issue is particularly pressing at larger firms that have higher turnover rates for advisors. With these organizations, clients might cycle through advisors every six months, and never get a chance to build a long-term, trusting relationship with any one person.

Proactivity

We exist in an ever-changing market environment. Retirees need advisors who can be proactive and adaptive in good and bad times alike. If an advisor is reactive and only makes a move after circumstances have changed for the worse, they won’t be as effective as someone who acted preemptively.

To sum up — when you look for an advisor, search for a fiduciary that you like and trust!