3 Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They Retire

3 Biggest Regrets of Baby Boomers Once They Retire

As the adage goes, “a life without regrets is a life not lived,” but it is also “better to regret what you have done than what you haven’t.” The three biggest regrets of retired baby boomers center on the things they have not done and teach the next generation to make more informed choices.

  1. Not Saving for Retirement Earlier

A rare absolute rule of finance is that people should start saving for retirement as early as possible, with the best time to start being in one’s twenties. Life expectancies are growing and show no signs of slowing down, so more money is needed to be stretched out for a longer period of time. Starting to save and invest as soon as one enters the full-time workforce can make a dramatic difference in the amount of money that accumulates by the time a person is ready to retire.

Many baby boomers failed to start saving on time and properly because they did not understand just how much money would be needed for their retirement. Some also did not know that receiving social security benefits or taking money out of retirement accounts before it is needed can have tax consequences that can substantially lower savings. Finally, many people tend to forget to adjust for inflation when considering whether they are satisfied with the rate of return on their investments.

  1. Not Working Less and Traveling More

A study of 2,000 baby boomers commissioned by British Airways revealed that one out of five boomers regrets not doing more traveling around the world. The survey data also indicate that only 9% of American workers get more than nine vacations days per year and that only 37% of Americans took all of their vacation days in 2015, suggesting that working too much may be an issue whose scope extends far beyond just the baby boomer generation.

A 10-year research project conducted by Karl Pillemer, Professor of Human Development at Cornell University, into the lives of 1,200 people aged 65 and older also revealed that lack of travel during one’s youth is a common regret. He writes, “To sum up what I learned in a sentence: When your traveling days are over, you will wish you had taken one more trip.”

  1. Not Working More

It might sound surprising given the decades of work they’ve done, but more than two-thirds of middle-income baby boomer retirees wish they had worked longer, and not for expected reasons. One might assume that people would want to continue working to keep earning their salaries, but for many baby boomers, wanting to keep working is about the work. People who are passionate about their careers and enjoy their work want to keep doing it. For this reason, many baby boomers return to the workforce on a part-time basis or as consultants. A number of baby boomers also enjoy working during their later years because they find that it keeps them mentally sharp, physically fit, and gives them a sense of purpose.

Should you rollover your 401k?

Should you rollover your 401k?

According to the Investment Company Institute, 401K plan assets reached $4.8 trillion dollars at the end of the first quarter in 2016. That’s nearly 20% of total retirement assets in America (which was at $24.1 trillion).

For 401K plan holders heading into retirement, changing jobs, or leaving a company, a big question looms: what should be done with this type of retirement savings account? Essentially, investors have to choose whether or not to roll the money over into a new account.

Options for rolling the 401K over include putting the cash into a self-directed IRA or transferring it to a new employer’s 401K plan. If workers decide against a rollover, the other options are to leave the account alone or cash out. Before making a decision, investors should look at the pros and cons and choose based on their unique situation.

Rollover Options and Advantages

There are significant advantages to rolling the 401K over to a new employer’s plan or IRA. Most investment professionals advise choosing an IRA, but it’s important for workers to also examine the quality of the new company’s 401K plan (if going to another job).

Pros of the Rollover into a Traditional IRA

Dr. Don Taylor, a retirement advisor and contributor at Bankrate, says that the rollover to a traditional individual retirement account from a former company’s 401K plan can provide “wider investment choices and potentially reduced annual fees and other expenses.” This flexibility makes the IRA an attractive selection, as investors can choose among mutual funds, stocks, bonds, and exchange-traded funds.

Like with a traditional 401K employer plan, money can continue to grow tax-deferred in a traditional IRA. That way, investors won’t have to worry about capital gains and dividend taxes each year.

This also allows workers to shop for plans with lower fees, and, if desired, select an IRA with more access to investing tools and management guidance. The IRA can also be withdrawn without penalty for specific purposes, like college tuition or a first-time home purchase (up to $10,000).

Pros of the Rollover into a Roth IRA

Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRA contributions are made after income is taxed—with the benefit that earnings are not taxed when withdrawn later. Because contributions are made after income taxation, investors have the ability to withdraw those contributions (not earnings) from the account without fees.

The Roth IRA does not have minimum required distributions after reaching age 70½, unlike 401Ks and Traditional IRAs. This makes it a potentially lucrative investment vehicle into old age and a good option for those looking to set up future generations.

Since the Roth IRA rollover requires a tax payment before transfer, Dr. Don Taylor attests that a Roth IRA rollover makes sense only if investors can come up with the tax fees from a source other than the 401K funds and “expect to be in a lower tax bracket now than when (they) start tapping retirement funds.” This makes paying the taxes now financially beneficial in the long run.

Pros of the Rollover into the New Employer’s 401K Plan

Most employers offer new employees the chance to roll over their old company’s plan. Getting all retirement plans into one place can make saving much more convenient and cheaper.

Investors should compare fees between the two company’s plans, and only roll over their old 401K’s cash if the new employer’s plan has lower fees and/or better investment options. The new company’s plan may even have lower fees than IRA accounts do.

For those that do choose to transfer to the new company’s fund, understand those earnings will continue to grow tax-deferred, and while those funds can be withdrawn after 59½ years old without penalty, workers may have the option to delay required minimum distributions (RMDs) beyond 70½ years old (if still employed at that company).

Traditional benefits of the old 401K still apply at the new company too. Investors are given more protection under federal law, as 401K assets are better protected from claims from creditors than IRA assets are. Many 401K plans provide investors the benefit of being able to borrow against the plan as well.

Options for Those Choosing Against the Rollover

While rolling the account over is traditionally the best choice, everyone’s personal situation is different. In some circumstances, one of the following two options may be the most ideal—or necessary—choice.

Leave the 401K Alone

The first and most common choice is simply to leave the 401K account with the old employer and let earnings continue to rise tax-free. For investors that like their current plan, aren’t paying a lot in fees, and are happy with its performance, this may be the best—and easiest—choice. Prior to doing this, do compare fee charges with other fund options, like the new business’ 401K plan and traditional and Roth IRAs.

In addition to having the benefits mentioned above for 401K plans, there is also a specific benefit for not touching the 401K. For those that leave their employer between the ages of 55 and 59½, they can enjoy penalty-free withdrawals before reaching 59½ (the typical starting withdrawal age).

Before doing this, ex-employees should check to see if their employers allow the money to stay in their old account. Most companies require at least a balance of $5,000

Cashout

A final choice is the cashout. Most investors don’t suggest this route, as paying taxes on the withdrawal alone could easily cut into 35% of the total amount (depending on the tax bracket). A withdrawal penalty of 10% would also be assessed if younger than 59½.

Additionally, savings would no longer grow tax-deferred, which means investors robbing their future selves. For example, take the case of a worker making $75,000 per year who has a traditional 401K with $50,000 in assets. This worker decides to withdraw it all after quitting the company. In this case, 25% of that amount would be taxed and a 10% penalty would be implemented, leaving the worker with 35% less, or just $32,500. If this money was simply just left in the 401K and continued to grow at a decent rate for one or two decades, this easily turns into a six-figure mistake.

The cash-out option is mostly seen as a last resort for those experiencing a legit financial emergency and can’t access cash from other sources, such as lenders, savings accounts, and family. Only do it if absolutely necessary. Nearly every time, borrowing from other sources makes more financial sense than cashing out retirement savings.

Making the Best Decision with the 401K

While the traditional IRA is commonly seen as the best rollover option for 401K plans with an old employer, everyone’s personal situation is different. Ideally, workers should always research and choose retirement savings plans with low fees and high returns. They should make choices that set them up for long-term financial success.

Thus, it’s advised to also analyze the financial advantages and disadvantages of rolling over to the Roth IRA, transferring to another company’s 401K plan, and leaving the money with the old 401K. Once workers have a clear picture of what makes the most financial sense, they can go through with the decision—and watch their nest egg grow to its highest potential.

Five Things Small Business Owners Need To Know About Retirement

Five Things Small Business Owners Need To Know About Retirement

A majority of America’s small business owners are not saving for retirement. Many know they should, but feel that saving will hurt their business. According to David Deeds, Schulze Professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis, small business owners do not save because they consider the business their retirement plan. “The plan is that when they retire, they are either going to transfer the business to a family member in exchange for a share of future wealth or a buyout or they are going to sell it off and turn that into cash.”

However, many circumstances may prevent the sale of a small business. Even if the business can be sold, the sale may not provide enough income to cover one’s entire retirement. Entrepreneurs may also have to retire earlier than they expected due to health problems or other unforeseen events.

Having a well-rounded retirement plan can help protect entrepreneurs against these and other risks. Here are five things small business owners need to know to plan their retirement effectively.

First, know the numbers. Small business owners should calculate how much money they will need to live on in retirement. Factors such as where they want to live (a pricier home or a modest apartment), how they want to spend their time (traveling or working part-time), and healthcare costs play an important role in this assessment.

Once they have an idea of how much they will need, entrepreneurs should get a valuation of their business to see if its sale or transfer is a viable retirement option. As part of their valuation, small business owners should consider whether the business can operate without their involvement. If it cannot, it may be difficult to sell or generate income from it once the business owner retires.

Next, determine a goal. This might seem elementary, but the power of having a firm vision for the future of a small business and retirement cannot be overstated. Entrepreneurs who set firm goals take steps to make sure their goals are met. This helps them find the best tools to save and also prepares them to wind down the business when it is actually time to retire.

Know the best tools. Business owners do not need to move significant amounts of money from their business in order to start saving for retirement. Investing just a little bit can help entrepreneurs save on their present-day taxes until they make withdrawals in retirement. There are four main instruments to choose from.

SEP-IRA: Like a traditional IRA, this retirement plan is tax-deductible. For returns filed this year, small business owners can contribute up to 25% of their income or $54,000. A SEP-IRA is a great retirement plan for sole proprietors because it is self-directed, but the 401(k) described below offers similar benefits but may be more cost effective due to lower administration fees.

Simple IRA: This plan is designed for entrepreneurs who employ 100 or fewer employees. Like for a 401(k), contributions are taken directly from employee paychecks and are pre-tax. Contributions cannot exceed $12,500 in 2017, but employees who are 50 or older may contribute up to $15,500.

Solo 401(k): This plan is for sole proprietors but may include the proprietor’s spouse. Proprietors may contribute up to 25% of their salary plus up to $18,000 ($24,000 for people aged 50 or older), but the total contribution may not exceed $54,000. A spouse who works in the business may also contribute the same amounts.

Simple 401(k): Small businesses with 100 or fewer employees may utilize this plan. Owners and employees have the option to contribute up to $12,500 this year, or $15,500 for people aged 50 and older. This plan also allows for borrowing against it and making penalty-free withdrawals to cover financial hardship.

A sole proprietorship, a partnership, limited liability company, or corporate can qualify for every plan except the SEP-IRA.

Keep investments simple. Most small business owners should probably invest in a globally diverse collection of low-cost index funds. An index fund invests broadly across entire markets like the U.S. stock market, U.S. bond market, and developed foreign stock markets.

Another option for simple investment is a target-date fund, which automatically adjusts the balance of fixed-income investments based on age and the selected date.

Diversify all investments. Diversification does not apply only to the retirement plans described above but to any asset a small business owner may choose to invest in. Getting all of one’s savings or investments caught in one basket can be risky.

This is especially true of home ownership. The real estate market is cyclical, so it can yield high returns or unexpectedly big losses. Small business owners who place most of their net worth in their home are cautioned to spread their wealth around.

Put it all together. With their numbers as their foundation and their goals in mind, small business owners have terrific opportunities to save for retirement. By utilizing the tools we describe to invest in a diverse portfolio, more small business owners can effectively build their wealth without hurting their present-day business growth.

Financial Conversations You Should Have During the Holidays

Financial Conversations You Should Have During the Holidays

The holidays are a time for festivity and joy. Families who gather want to catch up and spend quality time together, talking about work, kids, favorite TV shows, and so on.

It might sound surprising then, but the holidays are also a great time to have some important financial conversations with your family members, especially if you live far away from one another and are spread out during the year. While the topic of whether you’re planning to see this season’s latest Star Wars movie might be more appealing in the short run, taking time to map out your family’s financial future will help you better enjoy many more holidays to come.

Here are six topics to discuss that can leave everyone in your family feeling better prepared for the future.

  1. Where do you keep important documents?

This is a straightforward topic from which the rest of your conversations can spring. Knowing where important documents are kept can help keep you organized and on-task in the event of a future emergency.

Important documents can include wills, documents estate plans such as trusts, life insurance policies, living wills, power-of-attorney, and so on.

Also, consider discussing computer passwords if they will be required to access some of this necessary information.

  1. Do you have a properly executed will?

A properly executed will means that it was written when the testator (the person making the will) had the proper mental capacity and that he or she signed it in the presence of two witnesses who also signed it. A will allows a testator to direct how his or her assets will be divided after death. Alternatively, if someone dies without leaving a properly executed will (intestate), that person’s assets will be divided according to the laws of the state in which the person lived, which may significantly differ from the decedent’s intentions.

  1. Is your life insurance up-to-date?

Life insurance can help families cover out-of-pocket costs for end-of-life care and funeral expenses. But life insurance policies differ from one another. A key consideration is whether your family member has a term or whole life policy. Just like it sounds, a whole life policy lasts for the entire life of the insured, whereas a term policy lasts for only the limited duration of time specified in the policy. Make sure that a term policy is still in effect.

Additionally, regardless of which policy your family member may have, consider whether the beneficiary is up-to-date. Perhaps your family member initially named another relative as a beneficiary who is no longer alive, or with whom the relationship has changed.

  1. What would you want done if you suffered a medical emergency?

This may be the most difficult topic for people to address, so sensitivity is important when discussing medical emergencies or end-of-life questions. To help frame the conversation, make it a discussion about the oldest generation’s wishes for the future instead of a morbid dialogue about the end of life.

Consider working with older family members to establish advance directives so that hospitals and doctors will be cognizant of their wishes. These include a living will, designation of a proxy with durable power-of-attorney, or a medical directive arrived at with a physician. Issues to consider when making these decisions include the choice between prolonging life or improving the quality of life over a shorter time span, providing care or withdrawing it, activating life support or not, and so on.

However, these discussions may not always be appropriate. According to April Masini, an etiquette and relationship expert, it is sometimes best to steer clear of these conversations altogether. She says that, “If someone in the family has a terminal illness or is the partner of someone with a terminal illness, it’s inappropriate to discuss wills, estate plans and anything that has to do with death and money. The topic is too raw and should be conducted very privately and with specific sensitivity.”

  1. What are your funeral wishes?

Knowing your family members’ funeral wishes can help you create a financial plan to cover the expenses, as funerals are pricey. Knowing them in advance can also help you shop around ahead of time, instead of being forced to pay more when you’re grieving and time is of the essence once a family member has passed. Of course, even more importantly, discussing funeral wishes in advance will help you say goodbye to your family member with respect and dignity while honoring his or her wishes.

Would you pass this three question retirement planning quiz?

Would you pass this three question retirement planning quiz?

Reports claim that 10,000 Baby Boomers are retiring every day. But many of them are retiring into a standard of life that is significantly less ideal than they imagined. You don’t want that for you.

Don’t worry. If you’re smart, retirement will be a breeze. It just boils down to asking the right questions. 

Those questions are:

  1. Can you afford it?
  2. Where should you retire?
  3. How do you maximize social security benefits?

Retiring broke

One of the biggest fears people have about retirement is that they’ll retire broke. The problem with this way of thinking is that retirement isn’t an event. Rather, it’s a process that starts even before you reach your prime working years.

Unfortunately, more than half of Americans go into retirement broke, with nothing to show for the 35+ years they’ve been working. According to a GoBankingRates research, there is a significant chunk of the population that has less than $10,000 saved for retirement. Worse, many don’t have any savings at all.

A survey by Bank of America Merrill Lynch revealed that about 81% of Americans don’t even know how much they need to save for retirement.

Below are 3 questions to help you be more proactive in how you handle the retirement process.

1. “Can you afford it?”

The current economic environment has led to a rise in the number of people who are ready to retire but can’t. The common phenomenon is a hybrid; people are in retirement but they’re still working.

So, how much money do you need to avoid this situation?

To be able to answer that question, it boils down to one simple idea: your expenses need to be less than your income. There’s more to it, but that’s the basis.

Being retired means living on a fixed income without a possibility of salary increment. Also, your expenses won’t always be fixed: healthcare goes up, taxes fluctuate, and things cost more in general over time. There are assumptions you’ll need to make when saving up.

As a guideline, many financial planners advise you to start saving up to 15% of your income while you’re still in your 20s. If you want to know the exact amount, professionals estimate that you should have at least 10 times your last full-year income by retirement. Thus, if you make $100,000 in your last year of work, you’ll need at least $1,000,000. Use this online calculator to estimate how much you need.

To increase your income, start saving and investing as early as possible. Take advantage of accounts such as Roth 401(k)s and Roth IRAs.

2. “Where should you retire?”

Another thing most people overlook is the impact where they live has on their income. For instance, did you know that 13 states tax Social Security benefits while 37 don’t? Of the 13, 9 exempt tax up to a certain limit. The remaining 4 (Minnesota, Vermont, North Dakota and West Virginia) tax your benefits, no exemption.

Also, different states have different laws regarding estate and inheritance taxes. Some states have estate tax while others have inheritance tax. Yet, New Jersey and Maryland have both taxes.

You may also want to understand the different property tax rates across states. This will be crucial in helping you understand how you spend your money once you retire.

Bottom line: Understand the tax implications of your retirement state or city to save yourself from unnecessary surprises.

3. “Do you know how to maximize your Social Security benefits?”

A MassMutual quiz aimed at testing how much Americans know about the Social Security retirement benefits asked over 1,500 adults 10 basic Social Security questions and only one answered all correctly. Only 28% got seven or more questions right––this was the passing grade.

Will you be part of the many that retire without understanding how they can maximize their Social Security Benefits?

Although Social Security is designed to cover the disabled and survivors of deceased workers, is primary purpose is to assist retired workers with their monthly expenses and without it, most retirees would probably be in big trouble. According to a Gallup report, more than half of the retirees says Social Security is a major source of income.

While the Social Security benefits at Full Retirement Age (FRA) are capped at $2,687 a month in 2017, there are a number of ways that a retiree could use Social Security to boost benefits.

For instance, there’s a “Social Security secret” you can use to get an additional $15,978 each year. Retirees can influence the amount they are paid in Social Security by choosing when (what age) to claim their benefits. At FRA, a retiree is entitled to 100% of their benefits. Retiring before reaching the FRA reduces the monthly benefit. However, holding off filing for the benefits by a year increases your benefit by about 8%. This method works so well that 23% of retirees regret not waiting longer before filing.

Depending on how “lavish” you plan your retirement being, you might need a little more or less money. When in doubt, always opt for the higher amount. You never want to be surprised by post-retirement costs, and you always want to be ready.